Higher Ed Funding Depends on Census Count

By: Tara Alexander | News Editor

Students can have a significant impact to their schools and communities by completing the 2020 Census. 

This nationwide survey helps determine government funding for the next decade. The Quad Innovation Partnership has invited PPCC to join other Colorado colleges in taking part in the 2020 US Census at My2020Census.gov

One person in a household can fill out a form for everyone living at the same address. Only one form is needed for each household. Students who are living at home should be counted at their home address.

With the COVID-19 pandemic scattering students more than ever, Census.gov says to use the address where a student would have normally been sleeping and living most of the time as of April 1, 2020. This includes students who are “home” (away from their college address) because of COVID-19 closures. 

Savvy students who want to ensure that their info is safe may be relieved to know that census data is protected by law. Furthermore, it cannot be shared with any other government agencies, from other federal entities such as the IRS to local law enforcement.

Each completed census form brings to Colorado higher education an average of $400/year. While it might not be tangible to students each semester, it really adds up. According to the Counting for Dollars report by the GW Institute of Public Policy, Colorado received $13 billion (that’s nine zeroes!) in 2016 through federal spending programs, guided by data derived from the census. 


This year’s survey will be many students’ first experience filling out the census. Even those who have previously completed a census form may not recall the questions. Here is what to expect when filling out Census 2020. This listing is from PikesPeakCensus.com, the official census site for the City of Colorado Springs which contains a variety of helpful resources.