Student Spotlight: Bradley Firebird, Writing for Tolerance and Inclusion

By Ciara Pack

Student Bradley Firebird, is highly visible around PPCC.

Anyone who knows Bradley knows he is a man of many talents. Not only is he an intern at Pikes Peak’s radio station KEPC-89.7 FM, but he is also the founder of a Black History webpage (PART). He’s known for his playwright genius, and was also last semester’s winner of the APPR Writing Contest. He is also an avid reader and part of this year’s Parley editorial team.

As an African American-Native American, Bradley embraces his cultural heritage fully, and often draws on the wisdom that comes from both traditions.

He says, “Connecting with the past can help you prepare for the future.”

Bradley used to live in Long Island, New York before he came to live in Colorado Springs. He says he feels like “a fish out of water,” here, because there isn’t as much of an emphasis on African American culture.

Bradley is concerned with what appears to be growing racism against the African Amercian community, and doesn’t shy away from talking about it.

“As an African American male, I am lowest on the totem pole,” he says.

He believes we have come a long way from the racism of the past, yet says we still need to go further toward a tolerance for all people.

Firebird believes that sharing experiences through writing can help bring people together to transcend race and cultural indifference, and he believes that celebrating individuality, perseverance, and progression among the African American community can help black people to connect with their roots.

Look for Firebird’s contributions in 2018’s Parley, out in May.

1 thought on “Student Spotlight: Bradley Firebird, Writing for Tolerance and Inclusion”
  1. Bradley is such an important figure and voice for our under-represented students at PPCC! He is a fine writer, talented radio-and-TV aficionado, and lovely person. His point about how African-American racism is, in fact, growing is eminently verifiable and well worth some campus- and college-classroom-wide conversation.

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